PULSE III: QUAKE Kirkus Review – It’s An All Or Nothing Battle Now

quake placeholderThis final installment in the Pulse trilogy starts up only moments after the ending of Tremor (2013), and the action never lets up.Faith Daniels is sure of only a few things in life: that she loves Dylan Gilmore, that they are both virtually indestructible due to their dual pulses, which protect them while giving them superpowers, and that they’re in a fight against an evil genius who thinks the only way to save humanity is to destroy millions of people. Representing all that is left of the rebellion, along with friend Hawk and military bodyguard Clooger, they head for a mountain refuge to take stock and come up with a strategy that will vanquish Wade and Clara Quinn, siblings who also have two pulses, and their father, Hotspur Chance. But they don’t have much of a chance to strategize, as the Quinns invade all too soon, taking out some of their slender forces and kidnapping Dylan’s half sister, Jade, in the process. It’s an all-or-nothing battle now, and the fate of the entire Western State rests in their hands. Carman keeps the action moving at all times, allowing well-timed breaks for his solid, likable characters to contemplate the difference between right and might, as well as mind over matter. An engaging end to a well-developed arc. (Dystopian romance. 13-16)

Chicago 2014

Voyagers, Coming Soon to the People of Earth

New York, NY (September 9, 2014)—Random House Children’s Books will launch a multi-platform six-part book series and gaming experience beginning in 2015, written by six bestselling authors, it was announced today by Barbara Marcus, President & Publisher, Random House Children’s Books and Susan Bonds, CEO and Co-Founder, of 42 Entertainment and their new venture, Animal Repair Shop. Mallory Loehr, VP and Publishing Director, acquired rights for Random House from Patrick Carman and Michelle H. Nagler, Associate Publishing Director, will edit the series.

The six-book series will be published on an accelerated schedule over twelve months. The first book in the series, Project Alpha by D.J. MacHale, will release on July 7, 2015, with the second and third books to follow in September and November 2015.

The VOYAGERS books will be written by six authors with more than 10 million books sold among them: D.J. MacHale (Book 1: Project Alpha, On sale 7/7 2015), Robin Wasserman (Book 2, On sale 9/1/2015), Patrick Carman (Book 3, On sale 11/3/2015), Kekla Magoon (On sale March 2016), Jeanne DuPrau (On sale May 2016) and Wendy Mass (On sale July 2016).

“This is a one-of-a-kind project for Random House Children’s Books, and to bring it to market with Susan Bonds and her team couldn’t be more perfect,” says Marcus. “We searched for a team of authors and partners who could create an engaging series for young readers that would be both educational and completely entertaining in print and digitally. We believe we have such a series in Voyagers.”

Each of the six books follows a mission to find one of six secret and essential elements that, when properly combined, will create a new power source to save the planet. The elements are scattered throughout the galaxy across mysterious planets and only a spaceship piloted by children can reach them and return to Earth safely. VOYAGERS was developed by multimedia pioneer Patrick Carman, who broke new ground with Skeleton Creek, a popular hybrid of books and videos. Carman was one of the initial wave of authors writing for the 39 Clues series, and has sold more than four million books in 23 countries.

As adventurous young heroes journey into outer space on a mission to save Earth, readers will join the VOYAGERS crew and become part of the narrative via their mobile devices. The online experience of VOYAGERS will launch concurrently with the book series. Codes and clues hidden throughout the books will unlock games, puzzles and videos, and new story threads online. The digital universe of VOYAGERS is being built and rolled out by Animal Repair Shop, a new venture from the award-winning, alternate-reality creators at 42 Entertainment.

“We developed the immersive online experience for VOYAGERS with the goal of extending the adventure beyond the page for readers, so they are not just following the narrative—they become part of the story,” says Bonds.

“The VOYAGERS author team is absolutely incredible, with each one bringing a unique strength to the series, together offering kids all the very best elements of sci-fi, mystery, and action-adventure”, says Nagler. “The books and digital experience are so seamlessly integrated, we know gamers and readers alike will be immediately drawn in to both, and won’t have to wait more than just a few months to get their hands on the next installment.”

And here’s the Publishers Weekly announcement:


How much do you know? Take the quiz!

Here are some random questions about all the books I’ve written – a summer quiz extraordinaire! How many can you guess?

The full name of the member of the Crossbones who is not Ryan or Sarah.
The full name of the second person cured in Dark Eden.
The high school Faith Daniels attends in Pulse.
The first names of all four main characters in Trackers.
The names of the two cats in the Land of Elyon.
The title of the 3:15 story in which a certain insect reaches an unusual size.
The name of the flying squirrel in Elliot’s Park.
The title of chapter 10 in the first Floors book.
The name of the man who controls the Highlands in Atherton.
Jacob Fielding’s best friend in Thirteen Days to Midnight.
The country where the 39 Clues book I wrote takes place.


What are the names of the two villains who run the Silo in the last Atherton book?
What’s the name of the device Oh is strapped to in the basement of the bookstore?
What was the name of the tiny car Dan and Amy drove in the Black Circle?
What book does Will Besting read while trapped in the bomb shelter in Dark Eden?
What’s the name of the game played at the Five Stone Pillars in the Land of Elyon?
Name one complete phrase Mr. Nibbles can say in Elliot’s Park.
What are the names of all four devices the Trackers use?
What round object does Faith use as a weapon in a training session in Tremor?
What’s the name of the floor in the third Floors book that includes the Tree Dragon?
What’s the name of the haunted hotel Sarah visits in the third Skeleton Creek book?
What’s the name of the ghostly snowboard rider Adam and Dylan encounter in The Lift, a 3:15 story?


How to face the culture of negativity if you’re a young writer

It’s a shame how negative the culture of reviews can be. I mentor several first time writers and received this email last week:

How do you deal with HORRIBLE, “you’re the worst author ever” reviews, full of NASTY mean things? How do you write a sequel when you know people out there HATE your work? I get lots of 5 stars, and then ill get these terrible ones, and I feel like they want to murder me.

The saddest thing about this email is that it came from someone who has real talent. They’ve worked incredibly hard. Many books by first time novelists have problems (mine did!), but patient readers realize that it’s a process – first time novels are often rough around the edges, but they almost all deliver on something important: a fresh voice. If you read a first time novelist and hate their book, constructive criticism is fine. But if you feel like totally trashing someone’s work online, my strong opinion is that you will hurt the writer a lot more than you probably think. Experienced writers are better at ignoring this garbage (though it still hurts when someone is mean!) – but the first timers take it hard.

If you’re a writer, especially a first time writer, here are five rules to live by when it comes to online reviews:

1. Don’t go looking for trouble.

Once you’re published you’re guaranteed to find terrible reviews of your book. Everyone gets them. There are plenty of mean spirited, awful reviews of my books. It’s tempting to go looking for the good ones, but reading the bad ones can really bring you down and mess with your confidence as a writer. So while it might seem like you’re going online to look for something good, you’re really looking for trouble. And if you go looking, you will find it.

Writers need to be on Amazon and Goodreads in order to do promotional work, so it’s not realistic to never visit these places again. But you can adhere to a rule I live by: never read online reviews or comments on Amazon, Goodreads, or BN.com. And be accountable to someone close to you (I’m accountable to my wife), because it ruins their day too when they have to deal with a whiny, depressed writer.

2. Be realistic about who is posting a mean spirited review and why.

I think most mean spirited reviews are written by one of three types of people: failed writers, know it alls, and outright jerks. A lot of personal garbage is wrapped up in many of these reviews, so you can’t really take them seriously. On the other hand, someone who just didn’t like your book and writes a reasonable review is more likely written by someone who reads a lot and just didn’t get what you were putting out there. Why they find it necessary to share this opinion with the rest of the world often has to do with promoting their own book blog. It’s fair game, but you don’t have to read it.

Understanding who is posting and why is especially true if you’re a young, first time novelist. A high percentage of people will go into the experience of reading a book by a person in their 20′s and assume it’s going to be awful. It’s a hard mountain to climb, and more readers should expect a bumpy ride with first time novelists and be nicer about the whole thing. Why these people read books by young writers to begin with is a mystery.

3. Remember: everyone is a critic

As a published writer you are a member of a deeply maligned creative group (be thankful you’re not an actor!). The system is set up for haters to thrive – it is what it is – but they only win if you care. Don’t care!

And bad reviews can be good for you. Polarizing reviews can drive sales. You’re better off with 100 five star reviews and 100 one star reviews than you are with 200 three star reviews. It’s hard to believe, but it’s true. People who love your book will fight for it even more in the face of mean reviews.

4. You have loyal fans and supporters, focus on them.

Your real fans will throw punches for you if you take care of them. True story.

5. A publisher didn’t choose you and your story because you couldn’t write.

It’s a long journey going from first novel to a career as a novelist. If you want to still be writing published books in 10 years, keep reminding yourself that you were chosen because you have the stuff and it’s up to you to keep getting better at your craft. Your first book is a beginning – there’s a lot of story left to tell.


New Comments

  • Elizabeth & Neveah
    me and my friend are doing a ven diagram of Sarah and Ryan if you could tell me some similarities and differences ...

  • Jess Kendall
    This series is amazing I seriously think this trilogy should become one big movie! I would like to know what Edgar looks ...

  • jennnifer
    pulse is an amazing book !!!!!!!!!!!!! :) ...